8 Reasons To Ignore The News…

…(Most of it anyway”) “Poor sleep pattern may be early sign of Alzheimer’s”

Does that headline look familiar to you? I saw one just like it in a paper recently and I really had to stop myself from laughing out loud in the middle of a packed train.

The statement itself is so vague and if you read the papers on a regular basis you’ll see dozens of those kinds of headlines. I ignore a large portion of them. Why?

The trouble is with a headline like that is 3 fold:

  1. The validity of the claim is negated when a word like ‘may’ is you used.
  2. The headline itself is designed to scare people into reading the article.
  3. Although based on research. If you often read to the end of articles it will often end with the words “although not conclusive”.

I always take articles like that with a huge pinch of salt as on a weekly basis you’ll see contradictory headlines. One week you’ll see a headline that says ‘chocolate is great for you’ and the next week you’ll see one that says ‘chocolate is the primary cause of diabetes’ etc.

Whether it’s articles about impending war, the gloomy economy or which celebrity is seeing who. Most of the time I turn myself off from the news.

This is the point where I make a confession. When creating a title for an article, naturally, I try and come up with something eye-catching; a title that will grab attention and will make people want to read the article.

I like to think I’m providing you with some solid information. Something concrete that’s going to provide you with some actual benefit rather than it being just something of a time pass. Most of the work I post is based on things I’ve tried and had results with.

I’ve ignored the majority of the news for the past couple of years and I fully intend to continue doing so. I do skim the headlines to find the ones that are relevant and worth reading. An example of that would be a story about an inventor recently that came up with a brilliant invention that made him lots of money.

I find stories like that fascinating because 1) it’s true and 2) you often get to see the results, perhaps in a supermarket or on the web in the form of a product.

Need more convincing? Here are 8 additional reasons to think twice before switching over to the news channel or opening a paper.

  1. Most news is sensationalist. The first few lines are there to grab you and then you get the full story and realise it wasn’t really all that bad.
  2. No news is good news and so you’re constantly being bombarded with negativity.
  3. A large portion of the news is one sided and so you don’t get really get an objective PoV. It can also skew your objectivity
  4. Reports like the example above are based on research which is usually incomplete.
  5. The news is designed to scare you into believing it’s true.
  6. Articles about health are very contradictory and so you if you watch them carefully for a month you’ll see at least 2 or 3 conflicting reports.
  7. Most of the real stories are hidden away in the middle pages.
  8. Watching and reading the news will take you away from what’s really important. I.e. being grateful and being mindful

Just as I was in the process of writing this article I discovered one that kind of said that most articles, related to health, are just subject to spin. I of course read it objectively and took it with a pinch of salt! πŸ˜‰

11 Responses

  1. skittles234 says:

    another excellent article dude! regarding your point about:

    “…an inventor recently that came up with a brilliant invention that made him lots of money.

    I find stories like that fascinating because 1) itÒ€ℒs true and 2) you often get to see the results, perhaps in a supermarket or on the web in the form of a product.”

    i thought of a 3rd point to go with the above – you’re inspired to do something similar and make a difference in people’s lives πŸ™‚

    loving ur blogs and catchy titles, looking forward to reading many more in the future πŸ™‚ xx

  2. Pat says:

    Totally agree. One of the best things I did for myself after the breakdown of my marriage was ditching the papers, current affairs and online news. Ignorance is bliss because the things you can actually rail against and try to change are those that push themselves into your life, and focused action is better any day of the week than a general anger or anxiety about how excerable the world seems, which it isn’t

    • Amit Sodha says:

      Hi Pat,

      I love that – ‘ignorance is bliss’ because it’s true. We don’t have to be aware of everything that’s going on or have an opinion about everything. We do have a choice about which things we pay attention too. And not all news is bad. There is a lot of good news out there too it’s just whether you choose to pay attention to it.

      Thank you so much for you r comment! πŸ™‚

  3. ZenPresence.com says:

    I cancelled my cable tv subscription 2 months ago and make sure that I don’t expose myself to main stream media more than once a week. I find that my life is much richer. I read blogs, talk to my wife, and ( gasp ) just sit and enjoy life.

    Dan Garner
    ZenPresence.com

    • Amit Sodha says:

      Hi Dan,

      An absolute pleasure to have you comment and thanks for filling me in on your experiences of cutting down on watching TV and the news.

      It’s incredible when you tot up how much time can get wasted watching the box. Last night was the first night I’d properly sat down to watch TV in around 2 months and I don’t really miss it. Like you, I find my life is much richer without it πŸ™‚

  1. October 1, 2012

    Hot off the blogpress: 8 Reasons To Ignore The News… http://t.co/ZYxxXJME tweet or stumble! πŸ™‚

  2. October 1, 2012

    Hot off the blogpress: 8 Reasons To Ignore The News… http://t.co/ZYxxXJME tweet or stumble! πŸ™‚

  3. October 1, 2012

    8 Reasons To Ignore The News: http://t.co/ZYxxXJME via @amitsodha

  4. October 2, 2012

    RT @amitsodha: 8 Reasons To Ignore The News… http://t.co/771fjqVJ

  5. October 13, 2012

    […] Stop Watching the News. […]

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