The Science Of Being Selective

We have a greater demand on our time than at any point in the past. We work longer hours and survive with less sleep and rest.

One of the great questions, of the current paradigm that we live in, is how can we stop putting so much pressure on ourselves, and how can we learn to live life from a place internally, where we feel relaxed and at ease?

It has been pointed out to me recently that I take on too much and I don’t plan my time well enough and the person who said that to me is absolutely right.

Sometimes I allow the ‘desire to please’ overcome my better judgement.

We’re constantly wired into technology and so our brains rarely have the opportunity to switch off and relax.

We have bigger social circles then at anytime in history and all the associated demands in attending social gatherings, remembering birthdays, anniversaries, conforming to social dogma’s and having to retain all the information the comes our way.

The epic truth is that if we continue the way we do then sooner or later something has to give and that has been one of the reasons that I have not blogged in the last month.

Now, more than ever, it is of paramount importance to to be selective and to choose how we use our time wisely.

Your time is the most valuable and precious commodity that you have and you must treat it as such. The way to do that is by employing the power to be selective.

I rarely spend time on social media and I’ve begun an old habit used to have by adding my free time into my calendar; something I have not done for a few years.

We use phrases like ‘pass the time’ and ‘overcome boredom’ which, to me, are all signs that we are not living from a place of gratitude not living in the present moment.

If you feel like you’re constantly on edge waiting for the next thing or always eager to be away from where you are right now, then you’re not really seeing the opportunity that is with you right here and now.

I hear people stress about commuting, but to me, that’s the perfect time to switch off and meditate. I agree that commuting is not always pleasant, but if you can use your imagination to make the best use of that time, the journey changes into what you want it to be.

Not only is that real life but it’s also a metaphor for life too.

Be selective with your time. In fact, being selective is both a science and an art form.

Don’t just meet up with people because you feel you have to. Do it because you genuinely want to and when you don’t want to, be honest with yourself.

Choose wisely who you give your time to and what you do with your time.

Don’t always just pick up your phone to text and do random surfing. Use some of that free time to relax and meditate. Use it to switch of and zone into a different realm of consciousness.

Anytime you use up you will never get back, once it has gone it has gone. It’s not like an object or money that can be replaced. Time has no insurance policy.

4 Responses

  1. Milumi says:

    “Time has no insurance policy” So true bro! It doesn’t come with a receipt either! : ) Sometimes we take on so much that we forget about ‘me’ time. I know I do! But I’m learning to curb that by balancing what I’m ‘expected’ to do with what I actually ‘want’ to do, eliminating all activities that get on my last nerve freeing time to spend with myself.

    • Amit Sodha says:

      Hey Bro,

      It’s amazing how much a shift in that simple structure can have – doing what you want instead of what you’re expected to do. It’s a tough lesson to absorb and sometimes I still find myself fighting it…but ultimately I know that it’s what’s best for me and just doing what I love.

      So good to hear from you as always. 🙂

      ~Amit

  2. Robert says:

    I think it is important to realize that a day has only 24 hours and that it’s impossible to do everything we must, should, need… to do. A good idea is to focus only on the most important tasks and if afterwards there is still some time left, to focus on those less important secondary tasks.

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